Culminating Assessment Utilizing Webquest

Introduction

In this WebQuest, students will be reviewing the content we have discussed thus far in the learning segment in preparation for a culminating, written assessment.  We have been discussing various elements of "The Tell-Tale Heart," including elements of narration, tone, diction, and point of view.  In discussing these elements, students have gleaned a common perception that the narrator of this short story is unreliable.  From close reading the short story independently, to engaging in a "Jigsaw Literary Study" of Edgar Allan Poe's short story within cooperative learning groups, the students have achieved various learning tasks and objectives.  This interactive WebQuest allows students to think outside the box in facilitating a response to the central focus of the learning segment, which is to ultimately justify WHY Edgar Allan Poe employs an unreliable for his short story, utilizing their prior knowledge, specific textual evidence, and prior requisite skills pertaining to ELA writing mechanics to facilitate a well-written justification.        

As an introduction to this Webquest, students are asked to click on the youtube link below, as it provides an exciting and engaging video synopsis of "The Tell-Tell Heart."  

 

Task

The focus of the task is to review the polarizing characteristics of a reliable narrator and an unreliable narrator and ultimately justify why Edgar Allan Poe chooses to employ an unreliable narrator in his famous short story, “The Tell-Tale Heart.” In order for students to adequately complete this learning task, they will be viewing a series of online resources that enhance their understanding of what it means to justify an idea. The students are expected to read each source carefully, and take notes on a separate sheet of paper as they read. By the conclusion of this WebQuest, students will be able to achieve various learning objectives:

1.     Students will be able to read/listen for main ideas within a literary text, informational text, and sources of research utilizing an online resource. 

2.     Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to analyze a short story through identifying and applying knowledge of elements (e.g. narrative voice, tone) and literary techniques (e.g. repetition). 

3.     Students will be able to evaluate and interpret an author’s purpose for employing an unreliable narrator using evidence from the text and prior knowledge.   

4.     Students will be able to use technology, including computers and online resources, to explore and create an essay in which they will justify the author’s purpose and answer the central focus of the learning segment. 

5.     Students will be able to make sense of unfamiliar vocabulary in the Webquest using strategies imposed in previous classes (e.g., reading for context clues).  

Process

In order to enhance your understanding of the difference between an unreliable and a reliable narrator, it is especially helpful, and particular important, to review the characteristics that render someone who is unreliable in literature.  

*Please click the link below, watch the video "Unreliable Narrator: Definition and Examples," take notes as you watch the video, and then complete the short quiz following the video.  

[https://study.com/academy/practice/quiz-worksheet-unreliable-narrators.html

After you have carefully viewed the video and taken the quiz, respond to the following question in your notebooks:

Now that you have gained knowledge of what an unreliable narrator means, how would you define, in your own words, what a reliable narrator means? 

LEARNING TASK #1:

Time to review!  Over the course of the week, we have been discussing in great depth the narrator of "The Tell-Tale Heart," looking closely at tone, word choice, and other specific details in the text that suggest the narrator is unreliable.  Now, it is time for you to justify why Edgar Allan Poe chooses to employ this type of narrator for his short story. To get started, click on the link below and read carefully "The Philosophy of Composition," taking notes as you read.  Read the sections titled "The Unreliable Narrator" and "Why Are They Unreliable (The Tell-Tale Heart)?" This is going to be really helpful as you move forward in your justification!       

[https://americanliterature.com/the-unreliable-narrator]

Great work!  Once you've completed reading these sections, try your best to answer the questions below in your notebooks:

Question 1: According to the article, why do authors use unreliable narrators to tell a story?

Question 2: What does the photograph "The Philosophy of Composition" suggest about authors and their free will in crafting narrators? 

Question 3: According to the author of this article, why is Poe's technique of creating an unreliable narrator for "The Tell-Tale Heart" "brilliant?"

ASSESSMENT LEARNING TASK #2:

Now, it is time to celebrate all the hard work and effort you have put into analyzing closely the narrator of "The Tell-Tale Heart." 

Directions: Respond to the following question using complete sentences and evidence from the text to support your answer. You may use scrap paper to draft your ideas. Please staple the lined paper to your typed submission if you choose to use it. Respond in paragraph format. Your paragraph should contain a thesis statement,background information, textual details, and a conclusion sentence. Your evidence used to support your answers should come from both "The Tell-Tale Heart" AND the links on Webquest that you have just viewed and taken notes on.  Your response should be typed, double spaced, and 12-point Times New Roman font.  

View the following tab, entitled "Evaluation," to view the evaluation criteria for this assessment. 

Question:
The narrator of “The Tell-Tale Heart” tries to convince his audience time and time again that he is not a “Madman.” Rather, he tries to convince readers that he is reliable and is telling a true story. How might you justify why Edgar Allan Poe chooses to employ an unreliable narrator for this short story?  Use at least two textual details to support your response.

 

 

 

Well Done!  Be sure to put your notes in a safe and secure place, so you may reference them as you prepare for your assessment.  

Evaluation

Score Point

5: Consistent and near perfect; few or no flaws present

4: Consistent though not necessarily perfect; many strengths and few flaws present

3: Reasonable control; some strengths and some weaknesses

2: Inconsistent control: more weaknesses than strengths present

1: Little or no control whatsoever; minimal attempt

Central Idea

Sharply focused central idea

 

Utilized the Webquest well to help formulate a central idea

Very focused central idea

 

Utilized the Webquest sufficiently to help formulate central idea

Somewhat focused main idea

 

Utilized the Webquest moderately to help formulate central idea

Barely focused main idea

 

Utilized the Webquest minimally to help formulate central idea

Unfocused main idea

 

 

Did not utilize the Webquest to formulate central idea

Use of evidence from the text and the Webquest links

Includes well chosen evidence from the text and the links on the Webquest to support the central idea

 

Evidence and ideas clearly and thoroughly developed

 

Relevant, specific, and accurate details

Includes much well chosen evidence from the text and the links on the Webquest to support the central idea

 

Evidence and ideas adequately developed

 

Majority of details relevant and accurate

Includes some well chosen evidence from the text and at least one of the links on the Webquest to support the central idea

Evidence and ideas somewhat developed

 

Most details relevant and accurate

Includes evidence from either the Webquest or the text to support the central idea

Evidence and ideas barely developed

 

Some relevant and accurate details

Includes no evidence from the text or the Webquest to support the central idea

Evidence and ideas not developed

 

Little to no relevant and accurate details

Organization

Evidence of planning and logical order to easily move through the composition 

 

Clear beginning, middle, and ending

Effective transitions

Some evidence of planning and logical order to move through the composition 

Has a beginning, middle, and ending

 

Moderate Transitions

Attempt of organization in the composition

Adequate beginning, and ending

 

Somewhat effective transitions

Little to no attempt of organization in the composition

Weak beginning and ending

 

 

Lacks transitions

 

 

Random order of composition 

 

No beginning or ending

 

Difficult for the reader to move through the response

Mechanics

 

 Student Score: ____/25

 

Proper spelling and grammar; no mistakes

.

Infromation effectively conveyed in a concise manner

 

 

Proper spelling and grammar; few mistakes

Infromation moderately conveyed in a concise manner

Some spelling and grammar mistakes

 

Information conveyed in a somewhat concise manner

Many spelling and grammar mistakes

 

Information conveyed in a way that is barley concise

Little to no command of language

 

Infromation is not concise and inapplicable to assignment

Conclusion

Congratulations! You have successfully completed your first Webquest!  Although this Webquest may have been a challenge for many of you, remember that challenges are invaluable experiences, and will help prepare you for greater obstacles.   

Now that you have gathered all of your wonderful research, it is time to "show off" all of your hard work in your typed assessments! 

You completed several different learning  tasks throughout the duration of this assignment.  You have demonstrated an ability to

  • read/listen for main ideas within a literary text, informational text, and sources of research utilizing an online resource. 
  • demonstrate the ability to analyze a short story through identifying and applying knowledge of elements (e.g. narrative voice, tone) and literary techniques (e.g. repetition). 
  • evaluate and interpret an author’s purpose for employing an unreliable narrator using evidence from the text and prior knowledge.   
  • use technology, including computers and online resources, to explore and create an essay in which you will justify the author’s purpose and answer the central focus of the learning segment. 
  • make sense of unfamiliar vocabulary in the Webquest using strategies imposed in previous classes (e.g., reading for context clues).  

BRAVO!