Figurative Language Webquest -Jan McGlauchlen Piedmont College

Introduction

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What is figurative language?  Did you know that by using figurative language, you can enjoy reading and understanding so much more? Did you know that using figurative language will make your writing much more exciting? Your audience will be captivated by your stories, poems, and dramas. In this web quest, you will learn about six types of figurative language: 

  • Simile
  • Metaphor
  • Personification
  • Alliteration
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Hyperbole

Do you recognize any of these types are already? If so, you are already on your way!  Watch this video of songs and it will give you a good idea of what you will be looking for. You will watch it again in the conclusion, and I guarantee you will recognize many more types.

 

 

Task

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Project Directions---

  • Each day you will complete the daily assignment from this webquest.
  • Guess What? You will be using Google Slides and making a story using photos.
  • First, you will create the photo story to teach a classmate about the eight types of figurative language that you will be learning about in this web quest.  Make it creative and fun!
  • Here are your requirements for your Photo Story.
    • First Slide-Create a fun and exciting title with your name and date
    • Each following slide-The type of figurative language, the definition, an example, and a photo/illustration to match (x6)
    • Transitions
  • If you would like, you may find photos on the internet or create your own illustrations.
  • This is a way to have fun and yet, show what you know!!
  • Create, create, create! This will be this 9 weeks project grade! 

GA State Standards addressed in this Webquest:

ELAGSE5L5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. a. Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context. b. Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs. c. Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonyms, antonyms, homographs) to better understand each of the word

Common Core Standards Addressed:

1.ELAGSE5SL3: Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence

ELAGSE5L3: Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. a. Expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.* b. Compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g., dialects, registers) used in stories, dramas, or poems

ELAGSE5L5: 

  • Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
    • Vary sentence patterns for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.*

ELAGSE5SL5: Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.

 
   
 
Process

Day 1- Simile

A simile is a comparison between two objects using the words like or as.  

Examples:  The night was like coal.    The cat was as sly as a fox.

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1. Go to this site for further information about similes: https://www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/figures-similes-list.htm

  • Open your LA interactive notebook, jot down three examples of a SIMILE and their definitions.  Illustrate one. 
  1. Complete this quiz: http://www.softschools.com/quizzes/grammar/similes/quiz3468.html.  You may use your notes!
  2. Use this game to see how many of these common similes you have heard of!  Write down your score! https://www.englishclub.com/esl-games/vocabulary/matching-similes-1.htm
  3. Use your remaining time to work on your Picture Story!  Begin by creating the page for Simile!
  4. Don't forget to review the directions. https://www.createwebquest.com/node/56366/edit

Day 2: Metaphor

Metaphor Definition

 

If you can create a simile, you can easily make it into a metaphor by removing the like or as.

A metaphor is a comparison between two objects not using like or as.  

Example: The boy was a cheeta running the race.  The popcorn was a fireworks display as it popped in the microwave.

  1. Go to this site for further information about metaphors- https://www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/figures-metaphor.htm
  2.  Open your LA interactive notebooks, jot down three examples of a SIMILE and their definitions.  Illustrate one. 
  3. Complete this activity by writing the answers in your interactive journal. Read the story below. Write the metaphors you find.

                                                                                              The Haircut

When I woke up on Saturday, mom said I was a sheepdog with my long, shaggy hair, and it was time for me to get my hair cut.

When I looked at her, she was a zebra, half hidden behind the drapes of my overgrown bangs. I couldn’t help it. I laughed.

She was right, my hair had to be cut. The barber’s chair was a tower, and he pumped it higher and higher.

I didn’t really mind. I was an explorer, looking at the world in a whole new way.

The pieces of hair on the floor were an exotic carpet of strange brown fibers that criss-crossed in a crazy pattern.

The floor was an odd new planet, and I was an astronaut looking down from above.

The barber pumped the chair again, and I was a rocket coming in for a landing.

I couldn’t believe the adventure was over so soon. On the way home, we stopped at the store to buy some milk.

Unfortunately, there was some amazing sale going on at the time. We were tiny fish swimming in a sea of people.

I couldn’t wait to get out of there and go home.

The drive home was a frustrating experience, because the holiday traffic had turned the street into a parking lot.

I hope it’s a long time before I’m a sheepdog again! 

3. Use your remaining time to work on your Picture Story!  

4. Don't forget to review the directions!

Day 3: Personification

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Personification is giving human qualities to things that are not human.  You can personify objects, concepts or animals. 

Example:  OBJECT: My hair hates me!  (computers cannot hate; that is a human quality)

                CONCEPT: Time marches on.  (time cannot march; again, a human quality)

                ANIMAL: The tree shuttered during the storm. (trees cannot shutter in a sense that humans can)

Personification is giving human qualities to animals or objects.

Example:
a smiling moon, a jovial sun,

In "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath, for example, the mirror--the "I" in the first line--is given the ability to speak, see and swallow, as well as human attributes such as truthfulness.

  • I am silver and exact.
    I have no preconceptions.
    Whatever I see I swallow immediately
    Just as it is, unmisted by love or dislike.
    I am not cruel, only truthful--
  1.   Open your LA interactive notebooks, jot down three examples of a PERSONIFICATION and their definitions.  Illustrate one. 

      2. Open this website. https://literarydevices.net/personification/

  • Fold a white sheet of paper into four sections.  
  • Label one column "literal meaning" and one column "figurative meaning."
  • Choose four of the examples from the list to illustrate the literal meaning and the figurative meaning.  For example, if I were doing number eight, I would draw the birds standing around crying in the literal column and a downed tree with birds around in the figurative meaning column.  
  •  Label each illustration with the personification example, color them, and pass them in.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 3. Use your remaining time to work on your Picture Story!                                                                                                         4. Don't forget to double check the directions.

Day 4 coming up!

Day 4: Alliteration

Alliteration is the repetition of initial sounds in neighboring words in order to increase memory. Several tongue twisters use alliteration.

Example:  Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.  She sells sea shells by the sea shore.

1. Go to this site for further information about alliteration-  http://www.tnellen.com/cybereng/lit_terms/alliteration.html

  Open your LA interactive notebooks, jot down three examples of a PERSONIFICATION and their definitions.  Illustrate one. 

2. Watch this YouTube on alliteration. 

3. Play this game for practice. https://www.education.com/exercise/alliteration/

4.Use your remaining time to work on your Picture Story! 

Jump into Day 5!

Day 5- Onomatopoeia

Onomatopoeia is simply a word that imitates a sound.  

Example: Boom! Pow! Meow!  Ughh! Beep!

1. Go to this site for further information about onomatopoeia- ONOMATOPOEIA: http://www.tnellen.com/cybereng/lit_terms/onomatopoeia.html

1. Open your LA interactive notebooks, jot down three examples of a ONOMATOPOEIA  and their definitions.  Illustrate one. 

2.  Onomatopoeia Scavenger Hunt:

Look at this sheet on this website: http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_images/lesson909/OnomatopoeiaWorksheet.pdf.  

Copy the chart in your journal (do not copy the example).  Then go to: https://www.poemhunter.com/ and find five examples of onomatopoeia in poems of your choosing.  Record them in your chart in your journal.

4.  Comic strip: Get a white sheet of paper and fold it into four sections.  Create a comic strip using at least five onomatopoeia words.  See an example:

5.  Check your directions and the rubric!!

6. Use your remaining time to work on your Picture Story!  

 Almost done...day 6

Day 6- Hyperbole

A hyperbole is an extreme exaggeration. These statements are not literally true, but people make them to sound impressive or to emphasize something.

Examples: I nearly died laughing.  I tried a thousand times.  

1. Go to this site for further information about hyperbole- HYPERBOLE https://literarydevices.net/hyperbol

  • Open your LA interactive notebooks, jot down three examples of a ONOMATOPOEIA  and their definitions.  Illustrate one. 

2. Watch this PowerPoint.

Hyperbole-Powerpoint  

 

 4.Choose one example from the PowerPoint to copy into your journal and explain why it is a hyperbole.

5. Double Check your work against the rubric. 

6. Use your remaining time to work on your Picture Story! 

Day 10-Project

When you are finished, you will finish your picture story and upload it to Google Classroom.

 

Double check the rubric before you are finished!!

Are you finished?  Checklist:

___Journal is up to date with all types of Fig. Lang.

___Illustrations are colored.

___Alliteration collage is uploaded to Google Classroom.

___You have posted two examples to ALL posts. 

___ Presentation is complete, and uploaded to  Google Classroom. 

If all this is done, you are done! Congratulations!!

Evaluation

Evaluation

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At the end of this web quest, you need to: 

Make sure your journal is updated and complete.  Turn it in to me.

Make sure you have taken one quiz and one test.  They both need to be turned in.

Your picture story and presentation need to be complete.  They will be graded according to this rubric.

Rubric

Digital Storytelling: Figurative Language
  Photo Story
             
             
             
Teacher: J.McGlauchlen                                                                 
             
  Student Name:  
           
    ________          
             
  CATEGORY 4                    3 2 1  
  Title Title is creative, has name and date. Title is missing one component: creativity, name, or date. Title is missing more than one component: creativity, name, or date. Title is missing.  
  Information All eight informational sections are present. Definitions are detailed and make sense. All eight informational sections are present. The definitions make sense.  Some definitions make sense. Missing many informational sections.  
  Examples All eight example sections are present. Examples are creative and match the type of figurative language. All eight example sections are present. Examples match the type of figurative language.  Some examples do not match the type of figurative language. Missing many example sections.  
  Transitions Creative, appropriate transitions exist within the photo story. Transitions exist but may not be creative or appropriate. Transitions are not creative or appropriate. Transitions are missing.  
  Photos/Illustrations Photos accurately match the example and are presented well. Photos somewhat represent the example and are presented well. Photos do not match the examples but are presented well. Photos don\'t match the example and are not presented well.  
             
             
  Date Created: June 15, 2019 
Conclusion

Conclusion

I hope you have enjoyed our journey learning about figurative language. I look forward to seeing your writings and projects where you have implemented (used) these different types. We may not have covered every one of them in this visual, but maybe it will help you remember them. 

 

https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&rlz=1CAGACH_enUS851&biw=1366&bih=609&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=kT4FXZKVG9KD5wLOuq6wDQ&q=figurative+language+webquest+&oq=figurative+language+webquest+&gs_l=img.3..0i24l3.9213.10234..13198...0.0..0.827.1936.0j4j5-1j1......0....1..gws-wiz-img.IQbHCOGP9Ys#imgrc=KcTrxH7um7cmWM:

 

Credits

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This web quest was created by Jan McGlauchlen on June 15,2019 for EDUC 6601, Media and Technology for Education. 

https://www.englishclub.com

http://www.softschools.com

https://www.createwebquest.com

https://literarydevices.net

http://www.tnellen.com

https://www.youtube.com