HANDICRAFT PRODUCTION (EMBROIDERY)

Introduction

EMBROIDERY

Embroidery reached its highest development during the middle ages. The nuns in the convents were the first to make articles with embroidery work during their leisure time. Since then, it became so popular that women started to enjoy it, creating designs of their own. In the beginning embroideries were done by hand. But since the advent of technology and the invention of the sewing machine, people are now engaged in the machine embroidery. Today, because of the fast growth of the industry, elegance of designs and fineness of workmanship, Filipinos export articles with embroidery work. Embroidery work is best achieved if correct tools and materials are used. Tools refer to small or handy devices/instruments used in sewing while materials or supplies are those that are consumed in finishing a project.

There are various embroidery stitches which you can choose from when you do embroidery work. For you to gain more skill on this line, below are the illustration of some of the embroidery stitches which will help and guide you as you enjoy working on this lovely craft.

Task

At the end of this lesson you are expected to do the following:

1. Use the basic tools in Embroidery.

2. Create embroidered article.

Process

USE THE BASIC TOOLS IN EMBROIDERY

Embroidery work is best achieved if correct tools and materials are used. Tools refer to small or handy devices/instruments used in sewing while materials or supplies are those that are consumed in finishing a project.

Below are the tools and materials use in Embroidery its uses and maintenance.

Tools Gauge- use to measure short distance

Tape measure- use for measuring more than one-foot distance or materials

Thimbles- made from metal or plastic, protect the middle finger and push the needle while doing your embroidery work. This come in sizes 6 (small) to 12 (large)

Embroidery hoop/stiletto- made of wood, bone, metal or plastic use to make eyelets in the fabric to be embroidered. It is also use to keep the fabric stretched while embroidery stitches are applied on the design. It is advisable to place tissue paper over the inner hoop or twist or wrap the inner hoop with a thin material to prevent markings on the fabric.

Embroidery scissor- is small, sharp and pointed-good for fine work use for trimming scallops, clipping threads, and cutting large eyelets. Protect the blade by keeping them in a sheath or cover and get them sharpened occasionally.

Needle threader- is use for easier threading especially by those sewers with poor eyesight.

Pounce- is fine powder used in transferring design by pricking method.

 

CREATE EMBROIDERY ARTICLE

There are various embroidery stitches which you can choose from when you do embroidery work. For you to gain more skill on this line, below are the illustration of some of the embroidery stitches which will help and guide you as you enjoy working on this lovely craft.

1. Back stitch- the most often used to outline a design. This stitch also forms the base line for other embroidery stitches

2. Bullion stitch- a single detached stitch that is used for filling in a design area. Rows of bullion stitches may also be used to outline a design. It is recommended that one uses a needle with a small eye for ease in pulling

3. Chain stitch- one of the more popular stitches used for outlining. When worked in close rows, chain stitches make good stitches for filling the design area.

4. Cross-stitch- stitched formed by two crossing arms and may be used for outlining, as borders or to fill in an entire area.

5. Feather stitch- a stitch with a loop and stitches evenly worked on both left and right sides of a design area.

 

Evaluation

Direction: Identify the kind of embroidery stitches that is being describe. Write your answer on your answer sheet.

1. The simplest stitch and quickest to do. Used as outline or as a filling to make texture. The stitches are of equal length with equal spaces between them.

2. Also known as detached chain stitch and it resemble the petals of a flower when work in circle.

3. A kind of filling stitch which is ideal for making leaves or feathers.

4. A decorative stitch and can be experimented with threads for various colors over borders.

5. A popular stitch among embroiderers that can be used to create the eyes on an embroidered face or the center of a flower.

Conclusion

EMBROIDERY

 Ornamental needlework
 applied to all varieties of fabrics and worked with many sorts of thread—linen, cotton, wool, silk, gold, and even hair. Decorative objects, such as shells, feathers, beads, and jewels, are often sewn to the embroidered piece. 

The Bayeuxtapestry is among the most famous examples of embroidery. The art probably antedates that of weaving. Needlework is mentioned in the Vedas and in Exodus in the Bible. In ancient Egypt, gold was used for the decorative stitches, which often covered the entire garment; such work has been found on mummy wrappings. The borders of Greek and Roman garments were often finely embroidered. In Asia, sumptuous designs of gold and silver thread were produced from remotest times; the intricate embroidery of China became stylized and remained unchanged for centuries. From the richly decorative art of Byzantium (4th cent.) embroidery was introduced into Europe and thereafter followed the great period (12th–14th cent.) of church embroidery. The famous opus Anglicanum, or English work (e.g., the Syon cope, Victoria and Albert Mus.), dates from this time. Monasteries and convents were kept busy adorning vestments and altarpieces, and embroidery ateliers were founded. Secular needlework was far simpler, confined to embroidered bands around the edges of hems, sleeves, necks, and mantles in coarse and dull-colored threads. When Crusaders returned with examples of the superb fabrics of the East, interest in embroidery for nonecclesiastical uses was stimulated, and the technique of appliqué was developed. By 1389 pearls and spangles were being set in the embroidery. After the Renaissance, peasant embroidery flourished in Greece, Scandinavia, the Balkans, and many other areas. Embroidery as folk art was far less varied, complex, and imaginative than the masterworks produced by professional church and court embroiderers

https://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/embroidery

Credits
Teacher Page

This WebQuest is made by Dhea P. Jalos BTVTED-2 Major in Food Service Management of College of Science Technology and Communication INC.