Jack and the Beanstalk

Introduction

The Story of Jack and The Beanstalk - Fairy Tales for Kids - YouTube

Have you ever wanted to create your own story? Maybe you have no idea where to start. Today we will be reading a story and then adding our own twist to the end! We get to practice writing our own stories but the main idea is already there for us to go off of.

This WebQuest will allow you, my second-grade students, a chance to work on your comprehension and writing skills by reading Jack and the Beanstalk and completing a couple assignments.

The Indiana State Standards being used in this activity are . . .

2.RL.4.1 Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate an understanding of its
characters, setting, or plot.

2.RL.3.2 Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters and identify dialogue as words spoken by characters,
usually enclosed in quotation marks.

Task

Watch The Story of Jack and The Beanstalk - Fairy Tales for Kids | Prime  Video

1. You all and I will read the book Jack and the Beanstalk aloud.

2. After we are done discussing the book, you will take the online quiz over the book.

Here is your quiz. Click to go to the website https://www.education.com/game/jack-and-the-beanstalk-reading-comp/

3. You will write a brief description of one of the characters from the story. (1-3 sentences)

4. You will write a paragraph (4-5 sentences) to end the story. Write from your characters point of view and add to the story as if the last page was missing.

5. Once everyone is done, you will present your endings to the class and I.

Process

The Story of Jack and The Beanstalk - Fairy Tales for Kids - video  dailymotion

Together, we will pull out our books and read Jack and the Beanstalk in class.

We will then put our books away and have a discussion over what we just read.

Once we are done reading and discussing, you will get on your devices and take the quiz linked below.

Here is your quiz. Click to go to the website https://www.education.com/game/jack-and-the-beanstalk-reading-comp/

After the quiz, you can take your book back out for reference and get out a sheet of paper. You will pick your favorite character from the story, and then write a brief description of that character. Ask yourself things such as what do they look like, how do they act, how are they related to other characters in the story. (1-3 Sentences)

Underneath your description, you will then write 4-5 sentences finishing the story. Your paragraph will be from your chosen characters' point of view. You will give your own version of what happens next in the story without changing the original. This means that you must follow the original plot while adding your own ending that would make sense if added to the story.

Finally, once you are all done we will read your papers out loud to the class.

Evaluation

Rubric for teacher

Needs Improvement (1) Acceptable (2.5) Great (5)
Does not identify their character or describe them.

Does not identify their character but describes them.

                         or

Does not describe but identifies their character

Identifies who their character is and describes them.

The paragraph has nothing to do with

the story

The paragraph goes a little off-topic from the original story

The paragraph continues the story and

would make sense if added to the book

The paragraph is 0-1 sentence long

 

The paragraph is 2-3 sentences long

 

The paragraph is 4-5 sentences long

Students can get a total of 15 points for identifying and describing a character of their choosing, writing a paragraph that does relate to Jack and the Beanstalk while adding their own twist, and writing at least 4-5 for their new story ending.

Conclusion

By the end of this lesson, you should have used information gained from the illustrations and words in the story to demonstrate an understanding of its characters, setting, and plot. You will have done this by going over the story with me in class and also by taking the quiz at the end. You will also do this by writing your character descriptions.

You should also be able to acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters and identify dialogue as words spoken by characters. You will have learned this when writing your ending paragraphs.

Teacher Page

Lauren McLeland

Indiana University Kokomo

Using Computers in Education