Muslimah Shabazz-Seraaj Copyright, Fair Use, Personal Rights and Privacy

Introduction

Copyright, Course Materials and YOU!

“Copyright, Course Materials and YOU!” by giulia.forsythe is licensed under CC0 1.0

The internet has many resources to assist faculty and students in developing learning materials, but is it permissible to use an online resource that belongs to someone else? As students prepare to design learning materials using online resources, they will investigate legal issues affecting the online classroom. Materials found online are often thought to be open to the public and free to use (Davis, 2017). However, it is quite the opposite, and one should always assume that materials located online are under copyright protection (Davis, 2017). For example, if faculty use a video, passage, or photo to develop instructional materials without permission or attribution, this could violate the owners’ rights to intellectual property (IP). Therefore, when a faculty member creates instructional materials and online courses, it is crucial to ensure that no IP rights have been violated during the development process.

Additionally, topics to consider are the personal rights and privacy of students in the classroom. Education institutions continue to look for ways to protect the privacy and safety of students, faculty, and staff in the classroom. However, there are situations where private information is shared with external entities (U.S. Department of Education, 2007).

To become knowledgeable of copyright, fair use, personal rights, and privacy, each student will need to complete the following quests on legal issues affecting the online classroom. Upon completion of these quests, the class will be able to prepare learning materials considering legal aspects.

Task

For this assignment, students will participate in a digital treasure hunt using the internet to search for specific articles, videos, and resources on copyright, fair use, personal rights, and privacy to create a PowerPoint presentation to share their findings with colleagues. The student’s presentation should include a summary of the resources, assessment, and personal reflection on legal issues affecting the online classroom. Follow all APA guidelines. Length: 12–15 slides with a separate reference slide.

Following is the list of articles and videos students will search for using the Internet, Google Search, and YouTube:

  1. Before You Use Others' Intellectual Property Without Permission, Consider This . . .
  2. U.S. copyright law: The challenge of protection in the digital age
  3. Looking at, with, and through YouTube(T.M.)
  4. The role of intellectual property in an innovation economy
  5. Defending the freedom to innovate: Faculty intellectual property rights after Stanford v. Roche Item
  6. CopyrightX: Lecture 7.3, the rights to reproduce and modify: Derivative works
  7. What is a derivative work and how does it affect copyright?
  8. Copyright Law of the United States (Title 17)
  9. Against owning information, i.e. 'intellectual property’
  10. Balancing student privacy and school safety: A guide to the family educational rights and privacy act for elementary and secondary schools.
  11. Educational privacy in the online classroom: FERPA, MOOCs, and the big data conundrum.
  12. Copyright and fair use, as applied to education and teaching
  13. Creative commons kiwi
  14. U.S. Copyright Office: What is Public Domain? 
  15. Can I Use that Picture? Infographic Revised and Simplified! 
Process

This toolkit will help students research specific topics to analyze and prepare a summary and assessment of the research topic. The digital treasure hunt activity can be completed individually, or students may be placed into groups by assigning different research duties. First, students will compile research results and create individual summaries per resource. Then, they will assess the summary of each resource and reach a consensus about which resources to include in their presentation. This activity is beneficial because the students must decipher if the materials are helpful and related to the research topics.

Moreover, by participating in this quest, students will develop the skills to analyze, synthesize, evaluate, and present information. To encourage students to study copyright and intellectual property to further their understanding of proper use and its effects on the online classroom environment.

Evaluation

The selected resources will aid students in using critical thinking and tapping into their imagination. However, there are no predefined answers; therefore, students must use their research to form an assessment, reflect on ways to solve the problems and avoid legal issues.

Below is a rubric to help teachers and students assess individual effort on the quest. In addition, the scavenger hunt will help students understand copyright, fair use, intellectual property, and personal rights.

Evaluation Rubric
Digital Treasure Hunt 1 point
Needs Improvement
2 points
Fair
3 points
Good
4 points
Excellent

General Task Completion

The student does not complete the assignment. The presentation shows little effort and missing work requirements.

The student completes most of the assignment. The presentation shows minimal effort and missing a few work requirements. The student completes all of the assignments. The presentation shows critical thinking and thought.

The student completes all the assignments with outstanding effort, and the presentation is beyond requirements.

Online Research The student used one or two resources. The student used a few resources, including photos and online resources.

The student used a variety of photos and online resources.

The student went out of the way to gather resources.
Powerpoint Content

The student made a minimum effort, copied much material from sources.

The student made an effort to paraphrase. The student provided original thoughts and organized material. The student wrote and organized the article, synthesizing various resources.
Writing and Length  The student did not use APA writing and did not meet the length requirements. The student did use APA writing with minor errors and did not meet the length requirements. The student uses APA writing with no errors and meets the length requirements. The student uses APA writing with no errors and exceeds the length requirements.
  4 points = 63% 8 points = 75% 12 points = 87% 16 points = 100%

 

Conclusion

This WebQuest allows students to explore a related topic to their course study, formulate critical thinking skills, and assess the information to develop their ideas in the classroom. Students will create a presentation to educate themselves on the issues surrounding their course of study. Additionally, they will acquire the necessary skills required for developing future learning materials.

Credits

References:

BerkmanCenter. (2014). William Fisher, CopyrightX: Lecture 7.3, the rights to reproduce and modify: Derivative works. --> -->. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTXvS8RBj28&feature=emb_logo

Creative Commons. (2015) Creative commons kiwi https://creativecommons.org/about/videos/creative-commons-kiwi

Davis, C. R. (2017). Intellectual theft or creative license? Copyright education and the visual arts. Journal of the Utah Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters, 94, 19–31.

EmergingEdTech. (2010). Copyright and fair use, as applied to education and teaching --> -->. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=islFL7h8ADc&t=1s

Forsythe, G. (2012, February 29). Copyright, course materials and you!  [Drawing]. Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/59217476@N00/6794081182). CC0 1.0 https://search.creativecommons.org/photos/55080bb5-d124-4ad8-88e7-e73e990ba3c9

Legal Zoom. (2012). What is a derivative work and how does it affect copyright? --> -->. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtTUqEG32aY

Lieberstein, M. A., & Bryner, W. M. (2014). Before you use others’ intellectual property without permission, consider this . . Franchise Law Journal, 34(2),131-154. 

Long, S. A. (2006). U.S. copyright law: The challenge of protection in the digital age. New Library World, 107(9), 450-452. http://dx.doi.org.proxy1.ncu.edu/10.1108/03074800610702633

Mossoff, A. (2017). The role of intellectual property in an innovation economy. Hayek Lecture Series. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RULG3ImWvH8

Nelson, C. R., Barnett, G., Gorman, R. A., Reichman, H., Zurbriggen, E., & Nisenson, A. M. (2014). Defending the freedom to innovate: Faculty intellectual property rights after Stanford v. Roche. Academe, 100(4), 38-56. https://www.proquest.com/trade-journals/defending-freedom-innovate-faculty-intellectual/docview/1554587426/se-2?accountid=28180

Newbold, C. (2019, February 27). Can I use that picture? Infographic revised and simplified! https://thevisualcommunicationguy.com/2019/02/27/can-i-use-that-picture-infographic-revised-and-simplified/

Roper, J. (2012). An exploration of copyright law in distance education. Journal of Applied Learning Technology, 2(4), 16–20.

Soukup, P. A., S.J. (2014). Looking at, with, and through YouTube(T.M.). Communication Research Trends, 33(3), 3-34.

U.S. Copyright Office. (2011). U.S. copyright law. https://copyright.gov/title17/

U.S. Copyright Office. (2019). What is public domain? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMp_-OX15Jc

U.S. Department of Education. (2007). Balancing student privacy and school safety: A guide to the family educational rights and privacy act for elementary and secondary schools. https://web.archive.org/web/20210426062700/http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/brochures/elsec.html

Young, E. (2015). Educational privacy in the online classroom: FERPA, MOOCs, and the big data conundrum. Harvard Journal of Law & Technology, 28(2), 549–592.

 

Teacher Page

This assignment will provide students the opportunity to learn more about copyright, fair use, and the challenges that are impacting how educational institutions are operating to maintain personal rights and privacy.

Students will research the legal issues in the classroom and synthesize information. It helps students to be able to find resources and formulate their understanding of the topic. Then, students will create their presentations to share with colleagues. 

Teachers can adapt this lesson for a group assignment if needed.